Positive thinking is about choice and the desire to feel good through your life. All thinking and decisions are choices. We have the power of choosing how to perceive a situation and, as a result of our thoughts and feelings, we then decide how to act.
When an event occurs, we immediately ask ourselves the question, “What does this mean?” Our thinking is layered by our overarching bias towards or against something. So, for example, a stranger can give you flowers, and your personal story begins to dictate how you will think. You may think, “That’s weird. What does he want from me?” or you may think, “That was very kind of him.”
The question you ask brings about a feeling. The “that’s weird” thought brings about a feeling of fear stemming from distrust, whereas the “kind” comment brings a more pleasant feeling reinforcing a belief in the kindness of strangers. Neither one of these thoughts are wrong or right, but they do lead to a certain feeling you’ll have as an outcome, which begs the question, How do you want to feel as you go through your day?
The power of positive thinking and choosing to look at what’s good about a situation allows a person to feel great throughout the day. Granted, you can have a positive feeling of “that was nice”, and the person really did want something from you; however, the person who is thinking more positively is not as affected emotionally by the stranger’s “ask” as the person who was more distrustful. Think about it this way: the person starting with a negative perspective is then adding another negative to their belief (I don’t trust him and he wants something). The positive thinker is starting from a positive (“Strangers are kind”) and adding a negative (“he wants something”), which bring the person back to zero, or the place they started from, which is positivity. In the end, the positive thinker is not as affected by others and therefore remains with a positive feeling.
If your goal is to feel good, choosing to see what could be great about each event allows you to feel better about your life. As a result, you will, in turn, create the power to act with kindness, which more often than not will be reciprocated by others, which adds to your overall good feelings and perspective of positivity.
In the end, how you see life is a choice. Your mind is a Gifted Storyteller. If you want to feel good, choosing to see the good in each situation will allow for positive feelings, which affects your well-being and health, leading to a more abundant life.

Opinions expressed here by Contributors are their own.

Gregg Korrol

Gregg Korrol is the author of The Gifted Storyteller: The Power is in the Story You Tell, a #1 Bestseller on Amazon with dozens of 5 Star reviews. Gregg additionally works in the field of education, with over 20 years experience as a teacher and school leader in NYC. He has received numerous awards and accolades as a leader in his field, and sat on various advisory teams for top education officials. Gregg’s passion is helping people see empowering meaning in the present moment and seize the opportunity to create lasting change.