Alex Lemberg and the Nimbus Platform

Now we hear from a key player in the decentralized finance industry, Alex Lemberg, the CEO of DeFi’s Nimbus Platform. As it happens, Lemberg was an NYC resident for over 43 years before he moved to Miami two years ago.

He has spent nearly 3 decades in financial services, from traditional finance to alternative assets, managing a full range of financial products. Included on his impressive resume are positions in bulge bracket organizations, capital markets, and starting the data visualization for business intelligence for Cisco funds. He spent half his career in operations, strategic services, and R&D.

The Nimbus Platform he leads offers an easy and efficient access point to the best that DeFi has to offer. The DeFi hub features 15 customizable earning strategies, reward calculators, rich sources of market data, and other useful benefits for those interested in exploring and participating in the new crypto industry.

It also allows users to participate in lending pools, generate 100% APY  for providing liquidity and LP staking, and numerous other different staking options, all of which are highly popular services on the platform right now. According to its total value locked (TVL), representing the sum of all DeFi assets, Nimbus is currently among the top 10% of DeFi projects as the 141st out of 1525 registered projects in total.

Lemberg’s View on NYC…

Commenting on Adams’ new move, the Nimbus CEO forecasts that having an NYC Mayor who promotes crypto will be a tremendous boost for crypto industries and the future of regulation. With Lemberg’s history in finance, he should know what to expect in this industry and believes that New York could take the lead in technology and cryptocurrency contributions.

The City now has the potential to become the major center for decentralized finance, blockchain, and cryptocurrency. He also sees institutional banking and institutional finance in general moving to the blockchain.

Although some banks and hedge funds have left New York, Lemberg points out that traditional institutions are still very much present in the City. As financial institutions start making their way onto DeFi platforms, he predicts that companies located in NYC will have the advantage of a central location for human-scale business activity, such as in-person meetings. Since the City is still the traditional financial capital of the world, Lemberg believes there is no reason for it to not become the same for decentralized finance also.

In fact, it makes sense for NYC to follow this path, as traditional and decentralized finance become more interconnected and processes improve. This potential will allow NYC to win the race to become the crypto hub of the US.

…And Miami

Lemberg acknowledges that Miami has a head start, developing the infrastructure to support blockchain industries for over a year. Start-up incentives and tangibles like small business incubators and conference space are attractive to entrepreneurs.

 

He underscores several other major advantages for the sunlight city over NYC, such as a more favorable business and personal tax structures, lower cost of living, and a cleaner physical environment. Plus, many technologies and investment companies are now moving to Miami.

After all, new DeFi and blockchain industries may be decentralized, but they will still need space for their developers to meet, work and live. Lemberg simplifies the issue, “We’re in the decentralized space, we’re in the blogging space, we’re in the morning innovation space, [but] until companies start coming to market, they’re not going to be able to pay their people enough money to live in New York.” A place in south Florida would be preferred, particularly if it’s inviting.

Who Wins the Crypto Race?

I don’t believe there will be one hub to serve all cases. New York is the global gold standard for institutional banking and regulatory standards, and some of the greatest regulated innovations will and should come from there. However, these innovations will be limited to regulatory mandates and guidelines.

Miami, on the other hand, will showcase the extent of innovation in a less limited regulatory environment. Miami will look to NY to gauge a more structured institutional approach and NY will look to Miami to see which innovations can eventually be formalized.

It is a perfect balance and one that both cities should look to cultivate, support and maintain.