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Folabi Clement Solanke on Building Schools in Nigeria

The Arizona-based entrepreneur lists philanthropic athletes like Didier Drogba and Lebron James as his role models.

Many young American entrepreneurs aspire to be multi-millionaires and billionaires. They idolize the likes of Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, and Elon Musk, and focus solely on the mighty dollar, on getting rich at all costs.

It’s the American Dream, the epitome of capitalism.

For Folabi Clement Solanke, money was always a means to an end. The Arizona-based entrepreneur lists philanthropic athletes like Didier Drogba and Lebron James as his role models and aspires to follow in the footsteps of Aliko Dangote, one of Africa’s richest and most charitable figures.

The philanthropist wants to leave a mark, to educate, support, and help future generations. He believes that the greatest satisfaction is not counting your endless profits but seeing how your support has made a difference in the lives of others.

Through GENERATIONS Nigeria, a nonprofit he founded with his cousin, Solanke has been gradually rebuilding Nigeria’s broken education system, and he’s been doing it without any support from the Nigerian government.

“There seem to be two contrasting stereotypes about Nigeria,” he notes. “They either see it as a barren country like the Africa they see in charity appeals, or they see it as a rich, overpopulated, and lawless nation.”

The truth is probably somewhere in the middle. It has one of the 30 richest GDPs in the world, but it also supports one of the biggest populations and simply doesn’t have the resources it needs”.

Folabi Clement Solanke first realized that help was needed when he saw how the next generation of Nigerians was being educated.

He spoke about his shock at seeing rural schools for the first time:

“Most kids are out of school, as there are more children than these little buildings can support. The ones that have an education are taught huddled around chalkboards. They have to sit on the floor as they don’t have books or desks. It’s a stark contrast to what we’re used to in America”.

Through GENERATIONS, and his work as an influencer and philanthropist, Solanke is hoping to change the system for the better. He knows he has a long road ahead of him but has already made an impact.

“You can’t fix an entire education system overnight, and I don’t expect to help all of the 10 million Nigerian kids without an education. But if I can supply a few schools and build a few more; if I can see a child growing up with proper teachers and equipment, I know I’ve made a difference. That’s all I want.”

Folabi Clement Solanke is calling for support and awareness, especially during COVID-19 and the SARS protest, which have prevented a lot of aid from reaching the country. To support him on his journey, visit his official website or find him on Instagram @FolabiClement.

Many young American entrepreneurs aspire to be multi-millionaires and billionaires. They idolize the likes of Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates, and Elon Musk, and focus solely on the mighty dollar, on getting rich at all costs.

It’s the American Dream, the epitome of capitalism.

For Folabi Clement Solanke, money was always a means to an end. The Arizona-based entrepreneur lists philanthropic athletes like Didier Drogba and Lebron James as his role models and aspires to follow in the footsteps of Aliko Dangote, one of Africa’s richest and most charitable figures.

The philanthropist wants to leave a mark, to educate, support, and help future generations. He believes that the greatest satisfaction is not counting your endless profits but seeing how your support has made a difference in the lives of others.

Through GENERATIONS Nigeria, a nonprofit he founded with his cousin, Solanke has been gradually rebuilding Nigeria’s broken education system, and he’s been doing it without any support from the Nigerian government.

“There seem to be two contrasting stereotypes about Nigeria,” he notes. “They either see it as a barren country like the Africa they see in charity appeals, or they see it as a rich, overpopulated, and lawless nation.”

The truth is probably somewhere in the middle. It has one of the 30 richest GDPs in the world, but it also supports one of the biggest populations and simply doesn’t have the resources it needs”.

Folabi Clement Solanke first realized that help was needed when he saw how the next generation of Nigerians was being educated.

He spoke about his shock at seeing rural schools for the first time:

“Most kids are out of school, as there are more children than these little buildings can support. The ones that have an education are taught huddled around chalkboards. They have to sit on the floor as they don’t have books or desks. It’s a stark contrast to what we’re used to in America”.

Through GENERATIONS, and his work as an influencer and philanthropist, Solanke is hoping to change the system for the better. He knows he has a long road ahead of him but has already made an impact.

“You can’t fix an entire education system overnight, and I don’t expect to help all of the 10 million Nigerian kids without an education. But if I can supply a few schools and build a few more; if I can see a child growing up with proper teachers and equipment, I know I’ve made a difference. That’s all I want.”

Folabi Clement Solanke is calling for support and awareness, especially during COVID-19 and the SARS protest, which have prevented a lot of aid from reaching the country. To support him on his journey, visit his official website or find him on Instagram @FolabiClement.

Alexander Maxwell

Written by Alexander Maxwell

Internet Entrepreneur | Digital Marketing Expert | Marketing Consultant | Stock Market Enthusiast|| Founder & CEO at Maxwell Digitals, based in California.

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