I’m sure you have heard about gratitude lists. Every morning, you write a list of 10 things that you are grateful for in your life.

Some of you probably already do this, while some others are contemplating starting. Either way, let me explain why gratitude lists work.

As complex as the mind is, there are certain simplicities to it as well. When you do something repeatedly, your brain recognizes it and creates a pattern. Once it becomes a pattern and is on automatic replay, it speeds up the process of you doing that activity.

For example, tying your shoes. As a child, you had to really sit there, focus, and work at it to ensure your shoes were tied. But once you learned it, you don’t even pay attention anymore. You bend down while having a conversation with someone and simply tie your shoes, without a single thought.

Creating a list of the things you are grateful for has the same effect.

In the beginning, you work at thinking about things you are grateful for in your life and you write them down. You do this day after day, and it becomes a habit.

Once the pattern forms of seeing what you are grateful for in life, your mind is able to habitualize gratitude, hence you will literally be grateful for the things you see, as you see them. You’ll be happier because you will be grateful for people, places, and things in the moment. You become present.

Beginning is very simple. You wake up and journal ten things you are grateful for in your life. You can do the same in the evening as well (I generally only do it in the morning).

Do this daily, and you will see how your perspective during the day changes. Have fun!Opinions expressed here by Contributors are their own.

Gregg Korrol

Gregg Korrol is the author of The Gifted Storyteller: The Power is in the Story You Tell, a #1 Bestseller on Amazon with dozens of 5 Star reviews. Gregg additionally works in the field of education, with over 20 years experience as a teacher and school leader in NYC. He has received numerous awards and accolades as a leader in his field, and sat on various advisory teams for top education officials. Gregg’s passion is helping people see empowering meaning in the present moment and seize the opportunity to create lasting change.