Jeremy Adams is a success. He started what would become a multimillion-dollar company at 22, partners with some of the most well-known entrepreneurs in the world, and recently made Forbes’ 30 under 30 list. He has what a lot of people want. And yet, at the height of his success, he found himself incredibly lonely and asking, “What is all of this for?”

That critical thought led him to reevaluate his “purpose beyond profit,” and marked a definitive shift in his work philosophy. Fiscal success doesn’t necessarily translate to a happy life, and there are a lot of small changes that can keep you from existential spiral if you implement them before you hit the height of chaotic work.

“Obviously, I value wealth. We value wealth, but there’s a lot more to life! At Unicorn, we’re focused on having more purpose and making an impact.”

Partner with Existing Experts

You do not need to be the captain of the ship, the crew, and the person who built the boat. In fact, you shouldn’t. You might be able to do all of those things, but it isn’t sustainable or beneficial to your business to work like that.

“If I would have just found a reputable manufacturer from day one and just been the online presence, I would have made so much more money and had 2% of the headaches.”

Do what you do well and build a support team that can take care of the rest. Trying to do everything yourself is an ignorant and foolish pursuit that stems from arrogance and leads to burnout.

Work With People You Like

Don’t squander the incredible gift that is getting to choose who you work with! Most people aren’t afforded that opportunity. You don’t need to be best friends with your employees, but they definitely shouldn’t make you miserable, either.

Continuing a negative work relationship will add to your stress and loneliness. Work with people you respect and want to collaborate with. There is no reason to suffer a challenging work dynamic when you have the freedom to work with someone else.

Think Bigger

One of the major lessons Jeremy learned from working with Kevin Harrington was how to think bigger. Kevin would say things like, “We’re going to grow this to a $100 million company,” which was way outside the scope of what Jeremy was thinking.

It’s easy to set limitations in your mind as to what you think your company is capable of achieving. It’s a defense mechanism that keeps us from feeling like we’ve failed. If you set tiny goals, you can achieve them, but you also won’t get where you’re trying to go any time soon.

You might feel unprepared to level up that much, but take solace in the fact that no one knows what they’re doing…including the heavy-hitting brands. You figure it out along the way.

Keeping those three things in mind, continue to be generous with the knowledge you learn along the way, and always add value to your work relationships. Look for opportunities to share what you know and help others achieve their goals.

To check out Jeremy’s favorite tools for e-commerce and digital marketing, head to https://unicorninnovations.com/unicorn-training/resources/.

You can keep up with Jeremy on Instagram @mrjeremycadams and his website www.jeremycadams.com.

Opinions expressed here are the opinions of the author. Influencive does not endorse or review brands mentioned; does not and can not investigate relationships with brands, products, and people mentioned and is up to the author to disclose. VIP Contributors and Contributors, amongst other accounts and articles, are professional fee-based.

Josh Felber is no ordinary serial entrepreneur. Not only has he penned two bestsellers (one with Brian Tracy and another with Steve Forbes), he went on to win two Emmy Awards for executive producing the acclaimed documentary Visioneer: The Peter Diamandis Story.
Josh has appeared as a guest expert on NBC, CBS, ABC and Fox, and is the host of Making Bank. Josh is focused on challenging himself and those around him to achieve consistent excellence. His mission in life is to help over 100 million people design, develop and deliver their passions.